Lood Lab
Dr. Christian Lood studies the role of neutrophils in inflammation and autoimmunity with an emphasis on the contribution of neutrophils to the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. Neutrophils are the main immune cells in the circulation, participating in host defense through mechanisms including production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), phagocytosis and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), a recently identified neutrophil cell death process in which DNA is extruded together with cytoplasmic and granular content to trap and eliminate extracellular pathogens. Although beneficial from a host-pathogen perspective, exaggerated neutrophil activation and NET formation has been linked to autoimmunity, in particular SLE and RA.


Dr. Lood's research currently pursuing three main research aims, a) assessing how neutrophil-derived mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA are cleared to avoid unwarranted inflammation and autoimmunity, b) investigating the interplay between TLR8 and FcgRIIA in skewing neutrophils towards an inflammatory phenotype and c) identifying novel neutrophil-derived biomarkers related to disease activity and severity, including cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of mortality in young SLE women.